HEMASPOT-HF AUTOMATION IS HERE!

HemaSpot-HF automation is here! Spot On Sciences’ automated robot allows for easy sample processing from the HemaSpot-HF blood collection device. Simply load up to 60 HemaSpot-HF devices in the infeed hopper and get HemaSpot-HF wedges seamlessly loaded into a 96 well plate. Through the easy to use interface you can specify the removal of 1 to 8 blades and the transfer of those blades into a single well or 8 different wells. The software will collect sample ID, number of wedges removed, plate ID, well location in the plate, and date/time stamp.

The Sample ID is collected at station 1 from either a 1D or 2D barcode before the device is opened. The devices is rotated to station 2 where sample detection occurs through an optical sensor where minimum sample fill area can be defined. If no sample is detected,the device will be closed and rejected. At station 3, the robotic processing of HemaForm samples occurs. The applicator is removed and the sample wedges are removed and placed into a 96 well plate.

After processing each sample the applicator is replaced and sanitation of the robotic arm occurs. Rotating to station 4 the HemaSpot-HF device is closed and re-stacked into the outfeed hopper. Upon completion of sampling, collected data can be exported for further processing.

WHICH DBS RESEARCH MADE OUR TOP 10 LIST FOR 2016?

1. HemaSpot, A Novel Blood Storage Device for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing: HemaSpot, a novel dried-blood storage filter device, was used for HIV-1 pol resistance testing in 30 fresh United States blood samples and 54 previously frozen Kenyan blood samples. Genotyping succeeded in 79% and 58% of samples, respectively, improved with shorter storage and higher viral load, and had good (86%) resistance mutation concordance to plasma.

2. MALDI-TOF-MS Assay to Detect the Hemizygous 22q11.2 Deletion in DNA from Dried Blood Spots.: 100% concordance was observed between FISH/microarray wet blood and MALDI-TOF-MS using newborn DBS with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

3. Application of DBS to Determine Vitamin D Status: the Food4Me Project: Seasonal variation for Vitamin D levels in Europeans were measured from self-collected DBS samples from 1465 participants. Lowest levels were seen in January and highest levels in July.

4. Bioanalytical evaluation of dried plasma spot microsampling methodologies in pharmacokinetic studies applying Acetaminophen as model drug: Results from a PK study using dried plasma spots collected by fingerstick were equivalent to reported venous values.

5. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples.: Blood levels of persistent organic compounds, measured by GC-MS, were comparable in wet and dried whole blood and generally higher in plasma.

6. Evaluation of Amount of Blood in Dry Blood Spots: Ring-Disk Electrode Conductometry: The amount of whole blood in a DBS sample was measured by dipping a ring-disk electrode into extraction solution and detecting conductance corresponding to sodium levels.

7. Incident Infection and Resistance Mutation Analysis of Dried Blood Spots Collected in a Field Study of HIV Risk Groups, 2007-2010: DBS field sampling showed utility and cost-effectiveness for surveillance of persons at high risk for HIV infection to assess for disease incidence and drug resistance.

8. Geographic distribution of amino acid mutations in DHFR and DHPS in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Lao PDR, India and Colombia: Whole blood and DBS analysis shows that treatment for malaria with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine can lead to mutations in the parasite that confer drug resistance.

9. Comparison of Dried Blood Spot Collection Techniques in Nigeria: HemaSpot-HF showed higher concordance with rapid HIV antibody tests than traditional blood spot cards, possibly due to reduced sample contamination during collection and transport.

10. Analytical Chemistry For Assessing Medication Adherence: The costs associated with direct assessment can be reduced without detriment to the information produced, by the use of a finger prick blood sample collected as a dried blood spot (DBS) for the determination of drug or biomarker levels as a measure of medication adherence.

See for yourself how DBS technology is having a growing impact in clinical research. You can also submit a reference for additions to our database, as we look to constantly expand our knowledge engine!

NIH AWARDS GRANT TO SPOT ON SCIENCES

National Institutes of HealthAustin, TX August 22, 2016: Spot On Sciences, Inc., an Austin-based medical device company, has been awarded a $225,000 grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an efficient and cost-effective method for solid biospecimen preservation that streamlines collection and preservation while improving sample stability and accessibility for molecular analyses.

Solid biospecimens, such as biopsy tissue, can provide critical information to determine the optimal treatments for a disease. Spot On Sciences will leverage a novel blood collection device, HemaSpot, to capture small homogenized samples from freshly excised tissue. The HemaSpot cartridge rapidly dries and protects the sample. Once dried, analytes including nucleotides, proteins and small molecules show stability at room temperature.

Lead scientist for tissue research at Spot On Sciences, Dr. Rob T. Taylor, sees tremendous benefit in simplifying the process of tissue sample preservation, shipping, and storage. He states, “Quite simply, we’re looking to establish an alternative to the costly flash freezing of tissue samples and the toxic and time consuming processes currently used in sample prep. Already we’ve seen how personalized medicine in the treatment of cancer patients makes a difference as we improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the tumor.” Dr. Taylor continues, “We want to simplify and enhance the preservation biomarkers from tissues for researchers in hospitals, laboratories, and in the field. Our preliminary data shows an ability to recover RNA transcripts, and protein activity from dried tissue homogenates derived from excised tissue the size of a pencil eraser. I’m very excited about the possibilities of this research.”

Advantages of Dried Blood Spot (DBS) Technology and HemaSpot

Based on well-established dried blood spot technology (DBS), common analytical methods such as qRT-PCR, immunochemistry and LC-MS/MS are highly compatible with these dried samples. The pre-cut paper on the HemaSpot device allows for easy removal of sample subsections for molecular analyses and research.

The benefits of this innovative method would simplify and reduce costs for biospecimen collection and storage while increasing availability for high quality samples for research and for molecular testing for prognostic and therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

Spot On Sciences hopes to eventually provide a commercial kit for for use in medical facilities containing all needed reagents and a simple device for collecting and storing homogenized tissue samples. Simplifying this process will allow sample collection from any environment including remote, rural and low resource areas while providing stable, quality samples under a wide range of ambient conditions.

Spot On Sciences has developed HemaSpot™ devices (www.spotonsciences.com) to simplify collection, preservation and shipping of dried blood samples and to reduce pre-analytical errors such as sample contamination, humidity exposure and errors from remote and/or self-sampling. HemaSpot products are being used around the world for testing a wide range of analytes including small molecules, proteins and nucleotides.

About Spot On Sciences

Spot On Sciences, Inc., located in Austin, Texas, is a medical device company that is actively developing innovative methods for collecting and storing biological fluid samples. The company’s current product, HemaSpot™, allows for simplified blood sample collection and storage for dried blood spot (DBS) testing. Spot On Sciences aspires to change existing paradigms in this mature market with technologies that simplify processes, save time and reduce costs. The firm’s success has been recognized with many awards along with recent grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Gates Foundation. In addition, funding has been received from DARPA SBIR Ph I, II and a Ph II Option contracts. For more information visit the company’s website at www.spotonsciences.com.

SPOT ON SCIENCES RECEIVES GATES FOUNDATION GRANT TO DEVELOP STANDARDS FOR BLOOD VOLUME

Spot On Sciences, Inc., an Austin-based medical device company, has been awarded a $225,000 grant to support research for a preanalytical, endogenous standard (PS). Currently, comparisons between blood sample types including wet and dried plasma/serum and capillary and venous whole blood is difficult. This standard would allow normalization between blood sample types which would increase control for sample quality and volume and would allow more precise analysis.

“Solving this problem will help everyone involved in the field of dried blood spots,” claims Dr. Jeanette Hill, founder and CEO of Spot On Sciences. “We are excited to improve test results with this new standard all from finger stick blood samples,” said Hill.

Spot On Sciences has developed HemaSpot™ devices (www.spotonsciences.com) to simplify collection, preservation and shipping of dried blood samples and to reduce pre-analytical errors such as sample contamination, humidity exposure and errors from remote and/or self-sampling. HemaSpot products are being used around the world for testing a wide range of analytes including small molecules, proteins and nucleotides.

About Spot On Sciences

Spot On Sciences, Inc., located in Austin, Texas, is a medical device company that is actively developing innovative methods for collecting and preserving biological fluid samples. The company’s products, HemaSpot™ devices, allow for simplified blood sample collection and storage for dried blood spot (DBS) testing. The firm’s success has been recognized with many awards including the Cartier Women’s Initiative Award (2011), SXSW Interactive Accelerator (2013), RISE Global Pitch Competition (2013), 1776 Challenge Cup – Health category (2014), the SXSW Austin Venture Awards (2014), Astia/WeOwnIt Venture Competition (2014), named North America champion in the Kauffman Foundation’s Global Pitch Competition and international finalist for Get In The Ring (2014). For more information visit the company’s website at www.spotonsciences.com.

Press Contacts

Sue Leininger
Spot On Sciences
512-827-9627
sueleininger@spotonsciences.com

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HAPPY 100TH TO THE CREATOR OF GUTHRIE CARDS!

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This month marks the 100th birth anniversary ofRobert Guthrie the acknowledged “father” of newborn screening and inventor of the “Guthrie cards.” Dr. Guthrie’s development of specially designed filter paper allowed for easy collection, transport and testing of blood samples.

His scientific legacy includes the development of the bacterial inhibition assay used to screen infants for phenylketonuria (PKU). Untreated PKU results in irreversible neurological damage. He also raised awareness of the need to screen for other treatable conditions and adapted his method for additional early screening tests.

Spot On Sciences owes a lot to Dr. Guthrie for being a tireless champion for blood spot technology. Our premier device,HemaSpot, is based on unlocking the power of dried blood spots (DBS). We salute Robert Guthrie’s groundbreaking work and recognize the growing impact of DBS in clinical research around the world. Interested in learning more about HemaSpot? Contact us.

TRENDING NOW IN DRIED BLOOD SPOT RESEARCH

Small Molecules Dominate DBS Research

As our database grows, interesting trends in DBS research can be seen. For instance, over the last 10 years, 48% of DBS publications involve small molecules, while 33% and 19% focus on proteins and nucleotides, respectively. HIV was the most tested analyte in both the nucleotide and protein categories with amino acids, acylcarnitines and tacromlimus the most popular for small molecules.

Most Common Analytical Methods

Another fascinating trend is the emergence of mass spectrometry (41%) as the most common analytical method, followed by molecular biology (such as RT-PCR and NGS) at 30%, immunochemistry (22%), and chromatography and spectroscopy at 6 and 1%, respectively.

Growth of Published DBS Research

We can also see the rapidly growing impact of dried blood spot technology. No more than 50 DBS articles were published annually prior to 2009. Since then, however, DBS research has grown faster than ever, with over 100 annual publications since 2012, and over 450 papers within the past two years! Small molecules are the most in demand analytes for the last 5 years, with proteins and nucleotides also picking up the pace.

See for yourself how DBS technology is having a growing impact in clinical research. Search our database by method, analyte, or keyword at /news/https://www.spotonsciences.com/resource-library You can also submit a reference for additions to our database, as we look to constantly expand our knowledge engine!

SPOT ON SCIENCES ANNOUNCES COLLABORATION WITH PANTHERA.ORG IN SNOW LEOPARD RESEARCH

Austin, TX March 14, 2016: Spot On Sciences, the Texas-based biotech company that makesHemaSpot™, announced its participation withPanthera.org, the global wild cat conservation organization, in research efforts directed at the endangered snow leopard in Kyrgyzstan. An international research team, led by Panthera, has succeeded in trapping and placing a satellite collar on a female snow leopard—a first for the Kyrgyz Republic. In addition to the collaring, data gathering such as measurements and blood samples were obtained from the temporarily sedated snow leopard.

HemaSpot and Snow Leopard in KyrgyzstanShannon Kachel (left), University of Washington doctoral candidate, and Ric Berlinski (right), a veterinarian at Toledo Zoo, radio collar the first snow leopard in Kyrgyzstan. Photo credit: Rahim Kulenbekov/Panthera/Kaiberen/NCMRD/SAEF/NAS/UW/SU

HemaSpot, a transportable blood sampling device, is based on dried blood spot (DBS) technology and enabled the team to secure stable blood samples from the specimen in a remote and resource-scarce environment.

Shannon Kachel, University of Washington PhD student leading Panthera’s snow leopard collaring project in Kyrgyzstan elaborated on this partnership, stating “The HemaSpot system helps us simplify the entire snow leopard capture and handling process – a huge advantage in the challenging field conditions that we are confronted with.” Kachel explained, “With just a few drops of blood, HemaSpot allows us to collect the samples we need while keeping our entire focus on the animal’s health and safety. It’s better for us and better for the animals.”

While traditional DBS is a multi-step process, Spot On Sciences has developed a system using HemaSpot that simplifies sampling and storage of blood samples. The device also ensures sample stability and quality analysis in the laboratory.

Rana Bayrakcismith, Panthera’s Snow Leopard Program Manager added, “We use HemaSpot cartridges to collect blood samples for later DNA analysis to determine relatedness between individual cats.” Bayrakcismith continued, “HemaSpot cartridges have really simplified our team’s logistics around blood sample collection, storage, and transport. We no longer have to worry about importing reagent fluids into other countries since the necessary liquids are not always readily available. The lightweight, easily transportable cartridges are much easier for traveling on airplanes, through customs, and in a backpack to the snow leopard capture location. And we certainly don’t have to worry about bottles leaking during travel.”

Panthera researchers have also announced that HemaSpot will continue to be used in snow leopard blood sampling when they return to Kyrgyzstan in spring 2016. As the saying goes, a leopard can’t change its spots and through the help of technologies like HemaSpot, conservation efforts have a better chance at keeping these endangered animals and their spots around for future generations.

About Panthera

Panthera, founded in 2006, is devoted exclusively to the conservation of wild cats and their landscapes, which sustain people and biodiversity. Panthera’s team of preeminent cat biologists develop and implement science-based conservation strategies for cheetahs, jaguars, leopards, lions, pumas, snow leopards and tigers. Representing the most comprehensive effort of its kind, Panthera works in partnership with NGOs, scientific institutions, communities, corporations and governments to create effective, replicable models that are saving wild cats around the globe. For more information, visitPanthera.org.

Panthera’s Snow Leopard Program in the Kyrgyz Republic

Panthera began working in the Kyrgyz Republic in 2014 in the framework of the Kaiberen project with the establishment of three community-based conservancies in the Alai Valley of the Osh Province. Community-based conservancies aim to empower local people by utilizing their important traditional knowledge of their lands to manage their natural resources in a sustainable manner. With training from Panthera staff, conservancy members are learning to monitor snow leopard and prey populations through camera trapping and surveys. Panthera is also establishing an anti-poaching network through these conservancies to discourage poaching and provide a metric for anthropogenic threats to the cat in this region, among other innovative strategies to conserve snow leopards.

About Spot On Sciences

Spot On Sciences, Inc., located in Austin, Texas, is a medical device company that is actively developing innovative methods for collecting and storing biological fluid samples. The company’s current product, HemaSpot™, allows for simplified blood sample collection and storage for dried blood spot (DBS) testing. Spot On Sciences aspires to change existing paradigms in this mature market with technologies that simplify processes, save time and reduce costs. The company has been recognized with many awards including the Cartier Women’s Initiative Award (2011), SXSW Interactive Accelerator (2013), RISE Global Pitch Competition (2013), 1776 Challenge Cup– Health category (2014), the Astia/WeOwnIt Venture Competition (2014) and named North America champion in the Kauffman Foundation’s Global Pitch Competition (2014). For more information visit the company’s website atSpotOnSciences.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

To the extent any statements made in this release contain information that is not historical, these statements are essentially forward-looking and are subject to risks and uncertainties, including the difficulty of predicting FDA approvals, the impact of competitive products and pricing, new product development and launch, reliance on key strategic alliances, availability of raw materials, availability of additional intellectual property rights, availability of future financing sources, the regulatory environment and other risks the Company may identify from time to time in the future.

Press Contacts

Sue Leininger
Spot On Sciences
512-827-9627
sueleininger@spotonsciences.com

SPOT ON SCIENCES PRESENTS AT MSACL 2016 IN PALM SPRINGS

The Association for Mass Spectrometry Applications to the Clinical Lab (MSACL) has accepted a poster presentation from Spot On Sciences for the 2016 conference in Palm Springs, CA.

The poster shows feasibility for monitoring the chronobiology of biomarkers in blood by using HemaSpot for blood samples that were collected at 8 time points within a 24-hour period. Disruption of cortisol chronobiology can be considered as a risk factor for CVD-related adverse effects.

HemaSpot is shown as an optimal tool for collecting blood samples and for monitoring biomarkers to elucidate the mechanisms of CVD related adverse events. To connect with Spot On Sciences at MSACL please send us an email.

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